Research & reports

Title: Deprivation and Child Pedestrian Road Casualties

Organisation: Department for Infrastructure (NI)
Date uploaded: 11th May 2011
Date published/launched: January 2010

The study was commissioned to review child pedestrian road casualty data for the 10-year period 1999-2008 and, in particular, to determine if there is evidence that suggests a link between child pedestrian casualties and deprivation.

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The study was commissioned by the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment to review child pedestrian road casualty data for the 10-year period 1999-2008 and, in particular, to determine if there is evidence that suggests a link between child pedestrian casualties and deprivation.

The study also included a comprehensive literature review of UK and Irish sources relevant to the study. The study was based on demographic and infrastructure data for each of the 890 Census Super Output Areas (SOAs) and road collision data for the period 1999-2008 supplied by the PSNI.

The road collision data comprised records for 64,651 collisions involving 109,385 casualties of which 8,829 were pedestrians. The number of child pedestrian casualties was 3,235. The 10-year data have been comprehensively tabulated according to a number of collision factors recorded by the police.

In addition to the 10-year dataset, a two year dataset was provided by the PSNI for the period April 2007–March 2009. Postcode information relating to casualties has been recorded by the PSNI since April 2007. This allowed an analysis to take place of how the location of collision and location of residence of the casualty are distributed and whether or not – for the 10-year data – the location of collision could be used as a proxy for location of residence of the casualty.

The conclusion was that the use of location of collision as a proxy for location of residence of casualty was appropriate in the context of this study. This view was supported by other research considered as part of the literature review.

For more information contact:
Richard Jordan
T: 02890 540104

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