Speed

Title: Go slow: an umbrella review of the effects of 20 mph zones and limits on health and health inequalities

Organisation: Durham University
Date uploaded: 29th October 2014
Date published/launched: October 2014

This research review, 'Go slow: an umbrella review of the effects of 20 mph zones and limits on health and health inequalities', is authored by five academics from the department of geography and public health team at Durham University.

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This research review, ‘Go slow: an umbrella review of the effects of 20 mph zones and limits on health and health inequalities’, is authored by five academics from the department of geography and public health team at Durham University.

The report says that transport is an important determinant of health, and that there is a well-established association between socio-economic status (SES) and risk of road accidents.

The team used systematic review methodology to identify the effects of 20 mph zones (including speed limits and road humps) and 20 mph limits on health and SES inequalities in health among adults and children. They identified evidence from five international systematic reviews on 20mph zones and limits.

They concluded that overall, the results provide convincing evidence that these measures are effective in reducing accidents and injuries, traffic speed and volume, and evidence that such interventions are potentially cost-effective. The report also says that in two of the studies there were improved perceptions of safety.

It suggests that while there was no direct evidence on the effects of (20mph) interventions on health inequalities, targeting such interventions in deprived areas may be beneficial. The researchers recommend further controlled evaluations that specifically examine SES effects.

For more information contact:
Jon Warren, Durham University

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