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Title: The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities

Organisation: University College London (Centre for Transport Studies)
Date uploaded: 19th June 2013
Date published/launched: April 2013

The objective of this study was to determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas.

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The importance of translating public health research to maximise the health benefits of effective interventions is increasingly being recognised. The objective of this study was to determine whether advocacy targeted at local politicians leads to action to reduce the risk of pedestrian injury in deprived areas over 25-30 months. Intervention group politicians were provided with tailored information packs, including maps of casualty sites, numbers injured and a synopsis of effective interventions.

Results and conclusions
Primary outcomes did not significantly differ: % difference in traffic calming (0.07), proportion of schools with 20 mph zones (RR 1.47%), Safe Routes to School (RR 1.34%), pedestrian training (RR 1.23%) or other safety education (RR 1.16%).

Intervention group politicians reported greater interest in child injury prevention (RR 1.09%), belief in potential to help prevent injuries (RR 1.36%), particularly pedestrian safety (RR 1.55%). 63% of intervention politicians reported supporting new pedestrian safety schemes. The majority found the advocacy information surprising, interesting, effectively presented, and could identify suitable local interventions.

This study demonstrates the feasibility of an innovative approach to translational public health by targeting local politicians in a randomised controlled trial. The intervention package was positively viewed and raised interest but changes in interventions were not statistically significance. Longer term supported advocacy may be needed.

For more information contact:
Professor Ronan Lyons

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