Help Forum

Help requested posted on 10th July 2017:

Driver Risk Assessments

I am trying to locate example questionnaires for completed Driver Risk Assessments or Driver Risk Profiling to enable organisations to identify their most at risk drivers. I know companies offer this service for a fee so I guess they may be closely guarded secrets but I have been unable to locate anything suitable by searching the internet.

David Rudd

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Response posted on 10th July 2017 by:
Saul Jeavons

E: saul.jeavons@transafenetwork.com
T:

Driver Risk Assessments

There are as you say, a wide variety available. Some of them are something of a nonsense... cobbled together with no science behind them and of dubious validity. The better ones are usually based on questionnaires originally designed for research purposes.

If you want to go down the route of sourcing/developing something then I'd suggest contacting current research leaders in driver psychology research and see what they will share with you. They are sometimes less protective of possible commercial interest than the private sector, but of course in this day and age, even academia has to be commercial.

The Manchester Driver Behaviour Questionnaire is what many of the better commercially available programmes are based on, but have a read of later research such as https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/140801.pdf to gain an idea of its limitations.


Response posted on 10th July 2017 by:
Derek C Donald

E: d.c.donald@btinternet.com
T: 01463792154

Driver Risk Assessments

Contact Neil Grieg of IAM RoadSmart to see if he can point you in the correct direction.

Neil can be contacted via Support@iam.org.uk


Response posted on 11th July 2017 by:
Matt Staton

E: matt.staton@cambridgeshire.gov.uk
T: 01223699652

Driver Risk Assessments

As Saul has said there are a few questionnaires used in academic studies into driver risk. The Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ) is probably the most widely used but also worth a look at the SARTRE study done across Europe looking into driver attitudes. The key thing in doing it yourself is you will have to establish what you determine to be increased risk so you will need to read around the literature to get your supporting evidence. Even if you end up bringing a company in to do it it's worth reading some of the literature so you get a bit of an idea if they're based on evidence or not.

Here's a couple of links/references you may want to start with:

SARTRE study - http://www.attitudes-roadsafety.eu/home/publications/

DBQ development - Parker, D., Reason, J. T., Manstead, A. S. R. and Stradling, S. G. 1995,
Driving errors, driving violations and accident involvement. Ergonomics,38, 10361048.

Reason, J., Manstead, A., Stradling, S., Baxter, J. and Campbell, K. 1990,Errors and violations on the road: a real distinction? Ergonomics,33(10/11), 13151332.

There is lots of discussion around about the validity of any of these questionnaires as predictors of collision involvement so be prepared to make your own judgement or seek some advice.

If you are looking for some academic contacts I can recommend starting with Andrew Morris or any of his colleagues at Loughborough University, or Lisa Dorn at Cranfield.


Response posted on 11th July 2017 by:
Jami Blythe

E: jami.blythe.8675@northumbria.pnn.police.uk
T:

Driver Risk Assessments

We would be happy to give you some advice from a policing point of view? As part of Operation Dragoon, we use a risk grading system (high, medium, standard) for road traffic offenders which we profile and monitor. We sadly don't have the luxury of being able to speak to them first so questionnaires are not possible, but I'd be happy to discuss how we go about grading with you. Or you're welcome to come up to Newcastle and spend a few hours with the team.


Response posted on 11th July 2017 by:
Paul Leatherbarrow

E: paulleatherbarrow@wirral.gov.uk
T:

Driver Risk Assessments

Hi David

We have used Driver Profiling tools as part of our Mind Your Business package available to the many businesses we have engaged with here on Wirral. This helps us, and the business, to identify at risk drivers through various categories such as hazard perception, knowledge, attitude etc and giving an overall risk score.

Please feel free to drop me a line to discuss further.


Response posted on 11th July 2017 by:
Beverley Mercer

E: bmercer@warrington.gov.uk
T: 01925 442689

Driver Risk Assessments

Warrington Road Safety currently offer Driver Profiling tool to local businesses to assess their drivers. I can set you up on a demo on our system so that you can have a look at the tool we use.

Happy to discuss


Response posted on 13th July 2017 by:
David Carter

E: Ralge@sky.com
T: 07791382519

Driver Risk Assessments

Such risk assessments normally establish eminently verifiable data:
- age, gender, level of driving experience, ever had any post-test driver training, ever had points/a crash?, hours at wheel per day/week, patterns of daytime/night time driving, miles per year covered, vehicle check data etc
Then some of these go into questions/scenarios that seek to assess:
- knowledge
- attitudes
- hazard perception ability (video/photo)
- behaviour.
Most, nay, pretty much every single one would not pass any academic test of validity and reliability even on a very basic level.
The only one that might pass such a test is that of Cranfield University/Dr Lisa Dorn, in my view.
What are you best doing? Analyse your crash history, the who, where and when. There will be patterns, pinch points and easily identified risk areas (manoeuvring, rear-ends, side-swipes). Address these. Obtain and demonstrate management commitment. Consider drip-drip training inputs:
- Driver notice boards, driver intranet boards
- driver workshops
- in-yard/at home vehicle check discipline
- on-road driver training (Eco, Defensive, Advanced MIX-UP)
I.e address the issue reasonably.
Any decent driver training consultant should be able to lead you through this process.
David Carter BA Hons, PTLLS, Rospa Dip.
07791 382519
David@dcrm.co


Response posted on 13th July 2017 by:
David Carter

E: Ralge@sky.com
T:

Driver Risk Assessments

One final point.
Once you have done all the DRA's you then have to ask what is our corporate culture.
Do we encourage the drivers to rush, cut corners?
Are we making it clear that management are supportive of the job getting done but it MUST be done safely and that the post-incident repercussions and inquest are to be avoided at all costs.
All too often, organisations sing off this hymn sheet but, on the ground, the reality is very different.


Response posted on 13th July 2017 by:
Darren Dowd

E: darren.dowd@eastsussex.gov.uk
T:

Driver Risk Assessments

Just yesterday i attended an event run by Driving For Better Business, who have a similar mission. They have risk assessments you can download, and other relevant info here;

http://www.drivingforbetterbusiness.com/

Also, the LA, police and fire service are in partnership locally to deliver the Sussex Safer Roads Partnership COSTS programme (Company Operator Safer Transport Scheme). While I'm not sure if they can assist you directly, they may be able to offer some advice.


Response posted on 20th July 2017 by:
Edward Handley

E: edward@wrrsconsultancy.co.uk
T: 07980 875002

Driver Risk Assessments

Excellent advice above so just a couple of points to add:
1. Quite a number of commercial driver profiling tools were devised by driver training providers as tools to generate more training work, so were designed to throw up a high proportion of drivers as high risk, in some cases as high as 25% where as the research suggests that the true figure should be under 10%.

2. The basics of driver risk assessment are contained in the HSE Guide to managing work related road safety, INDG382 which was revised in 2014. The guide contains a check list of questions.


Response posted on 27th July 2017 by:
Derek Cooper

E: training@fdat.net
T: 07834364602

Driver Risk Assessments

Personally never been a supporter of profiling, too many variables and opinions. Good old hands on person to person contact, never fails. The nearest to a best answer is David Carter. Company and driver interaction, usually works well. Putting common sense notices up on driver or canteen boards sets things in motion and the process starts. Always worked well for me. Like most on here, just my opinion, keep it simple!!


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