Help Forum

Help requested posted on 6th July 2017:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Seeking to reduce emissions from vehicles parked near schools, we argue that people should park further away and walk. We have (as most of us do) sufficient info to give people (benefits of walking, cycling ...) and RSEd in place to help (Bikeability, ped training ...). My question is; do you have any justification for taking action against people who sit in their car with the engine running?

Nick Ellis

Reply to this request


Response posted on 6th July 2017 by:
Dave

E: david.lawson@sheffield.gov.uk
T:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

FYI Nick - survey being conducted in Sheffield:
https://sheffield.citizenspace.com/place-business-strategy/no-vehicle-idling/


Response posted on 6th July 2017 by:
Will Cubbin

E: william.cubbin@essexhighways.org
T:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

There is the offence code RC86093 which is worded
"Drive a vehicle on a road and fail to stop engine the when stationary for the prevention of noise / exhaust emissions"

So I think it can be legally justified.


Response posted on 6th July 2017 by:
Steve Barber

E: sbarber2@kierwsp.co.uk
T:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Hi Nick,

I have been out of the job for over 20 years and didn't realise there was any such offence till I read Will's response.

I was going to ask if the local borough had a pollution-air quality dept, and whether there were any local powers they had to enforce?

Cheers,

Steve B


Response posted on 7th July 2017 by:
Andy G

E: blueacorns@gmail.com
T:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Whilst there is the offence as pointed out above, the critical wording is 'unnecessarily'. When there is just an adult/s in the vehicle then its far easier to enforce than occupants including young children or vulnerable persons who may need the engine so as to provide aircon (summer) and heat (winter). Perhaps one of the hidden issues can be vehicles misting up whilst occupied with no engine running and then driving off without having fully demisted creating the increased risk of failing to see pedestrians in what is obviously an area of distracted high risk pedestrians.
Great potential as an offence with some equally challenging side issues - the legislation is very vague and appears to be effective only in designated authorities and by designated persons so not police or PCSOs. Like most legislation and enforcement, perhaps the key means to achieve the goal is through education of drivers - admittedly a long, slow and often frustrating process


Response posted on 7th July 2017 by:
Derek C Donald

E: d.c.donald@btinternet.com
T: 01463792154

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Found this on Confused.com -

Leaving an engine idling is an offence
"Stationary idling is an offence under section 42 of the Road Traffic Act 1988," says Jeanette Miller, a managing director of Geoffrey Miller Solicitors.
The Act enforces rule 123 of the Highway Code which states: "You must not leave a vehicle engine running unnecessarily while that vehicle is stationary on a public road."
And doing this can incur a 20 fixed-penalty fine under the Road Traffic (Vehicle Emissions) Regulations 2002. This goes up to 40 if unpaid within a given time frame.


Response posted on 12th July 2017 by:
Alex Drysdale

E: alex.drysdale@westberks.gov.uk
T:

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Every day a school day...
S42 of RTA 88 states "A person who contravenes or fails to comply with any construction and use requirement... [snip]..is guilty of an offence".

Section 98 of the Roads Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986 states "Save as provided in paragraph (2 - blurb about stationary traffic exemptions etc), the driver of a vehicle shall, when the vehicle is stationary, stop the action of any machinery attached to or forming part of the vehicle so far as may be necessary for the prevention of noise."

Getting the police to actively enforce is the problem but at least there's legislation there in black and white to back it up which could be added to any leaflet handed out to parents guilty of hanging around outside schools with their engine running.


Response posted on 20th July 2017 by:
Edward Handley

E: edward@wrrsconsultancy.co.uk
T: 07980 875002

Links between RSEd outcomes and pollution

Quite apart from the offence of leaving an engine running unnecessarily, most recent vehicles are fitted with stop-start technology which will automatically switch off the engine when the parking brake is applied and neutral engaged, and drivers have to switch off the system to leave the engine running. Many keep the engine running to keep warm in cold weather and to keep the air conditioning going when it is hot, which wastes a lot of fuel and causes serious pollution.

It is worth noting that FORS (Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme) now have a requirement in the Bronze standards (O4) which requires accredited companies to have an anti engine idling policy, which must be communicated to all employees, so any vehicle with a FORS sticker seen idling can be reported to FORS who will follow it up and take action. FORS mainly applies to trucks and vans in London but is now a national scheme and many tenders and contracts specify operators must be accredited so it is developing teeth.


Post a response to the above help request by completing the form below:

Your name
Your email
Your telephone (optional)
Subject
My response is:
Captcha: