Help Forum

Help requested posted on 14th June 2017:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

I have been asked by a school for advice for supporting a Year 5 child with ADHD who has no awareness of danger when near the road. She understands the concepts of road safety, and can explain how to behave and cross safely while in a classroom or 1-2-1 situation. However, when out on the road in practice this all goes out of the window and she is 'in her own little bubble' and easily distracted by anything and everything around her. I have suggested lots of practice and repetition of basic 'stop, look, listen' on the journey to and from school with mum, with the hope it becomes habit. The school have used some cue cards in class for other situations, and we are considering adapting this for road situations. Does anyone have similar experience or ideas for resources or programmes? (She is working at the expected academic levels for a Y5 pupil, so I am not necessarily looking for learning materials for younger children, just something practical)

Jane Deeley

Reply to this request


Response posted on 14th June 2017 by:
Keith Baldock

E: keith.baldock@brighton-hove.gov.uk
T: 01273292258

Child pedestrian with ADHD

I have a child with similar - very difficult and we had to have reins or a good grasp on him until just after yr1. Cue cards/ visual cues very useful - like visual timetable. Also use of fidget spinner or worry beads or something to reduce the anxiety/hyper vigilance on journey . Got a very simple bookmark - stand back, stop, look, listen - with visuals as found this useful - not specifically aimed at primary as we had problem with bus mirrors hitting people on kerb - especially foreign students. However SEN parents have found them useful. If you want it welcome - can't attach here.


Response posted on 14th June 2017 by:
Alexander Allen

E: alexander.allen@medway.gov.uk
T: 01634331223

Child pedestrian with ADHD

Specifically relating to controlled signal crossings. We have had some success with individuals by informing them of the rotating cone under the push buttons, which rotates when the green man signal appears. Parents have found with some of their children the task of concentrating on this cone assisted greatly with their awareness of the crossing process, doubly so for younger children when told the cone is something 'secret'. May not work for everyone and assumes the local authority has rotating cones in all locations.


Response posted on 15th June 2017 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

perhaps the interesting challenge here is ways of making adult drivers aware that children with ADHD exist and what it means, so that they drive in such a way as to minimise risk


Response posted on 19th June 2017 by:
Claire Farman

E: claire.farman@dft.gsi.gov.uk
T:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

Just jumping on the back of this, we're in the process of redeveloping our THINK! child and teen resources. I wonder if it is worth us collating a list of top tips and tools for teaching children with specific learning requirements road safety? I know this isn't helpful to you now Jane, but it might be of help to others in the future.

I'll save the suggestions above but if anyone has any other constructive/practical thoughts, observations and/or advice on the above I'd be really grateful to receive them.

Thanks


Response posted on 19th June 2017 by:
Vicki Bristow

E: victoria.bristow@westmercia.pnn.police.uk
T:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

Thanks Claire - good to hear that DfT are updating their child/teen resources as they have felt a bit dated for a while, although please still ensure that Tales of the Road (or something similar) is still available as we use these a lot with our Yr6 students. Will the Seatbelts and child restraints booklet also be updated? as this is very old and now has inaccuracies in it following the new rulings regarding the use of booster cushions. We're always asked for information regarding this and there is nothing from DfT that we can use.

Thanks


Response posted on 22nd June 2017 by:
Angelina Dawson

E: angelina_dawson@sandwell.gov.uk
T:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

Hi Jane,
We teach independent travel to individuals whom have a variety of learning difficulties, disability, social emotional and mental health. The skills you are referring to need to be broken down into very small steps, explicitly taught and practiced within a familiar setting then introduced within a quieter 'road side' environment and then safe exposure to busier situations. These are skills for life that must be taught. They will impact on this individual in the long term and also benefit the parent/carer/support in the short term.
If you'd like further information or a discussion please drop me an email.
Claire my team and young people with learning difficulties/disabilities would be very interesting in becoming involved with the updating of your THINK! resources if at all possible?
Thanks


Response posted on 22nd June 2017 by:
Angelina Dawson

E: angelina_dawson@sandwell.gov.uk
T:

Child pedestrian with ADHD

Hi Jane,
We teach independent travel to individuals whom have a variety of learning difficulties, disability, social emotional and mental health. The skills you are referring to need to be broken down into very small steps, explicitly taught and practiced within a familiar setting then introduced within a quieter 'road side' environment and then safe exposure to busier situations. These are skills for life that must be taught. They will impact on this individual in the long term and also benefit the parent/carer/support in the short term.
If you'd like further information or a discussion please drop me an email.
Claire my team and young people with learning difficulties/disabilities would be very interesting in becoming involved with the updating of your THINK! resources if at all possible?
Thanks


Post a response to the above help request by completing the form below:

Your name
Your email
Your telephone (optional)
Subject
My response is:
Captcha: