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Help requested posted on 9th May 2017:

Removal of cycle lanes

W've a main city road with non-compulsory cycle lanes. It's in a 20mph limit, lots of traffic with lots of junctions/shops etc along it and is fairly narrow.

The cycle lanes are narrow themselves and are not continuous - though along most of it. It's a bus route and lots of Uni students etc use it.

We've had a lot of cyclist junction collisions on it as drivers dive through traffic as spaces occur - with the cyclist hidden. Causation much of time - failure to look properly. We've had studies done on it.

I'd like to remove the cycle lanes and have the cycles join the main traffic - not encourage them to be on the side of the road hidden at junctions in particular. It was suspected - by me - that the cyclists were speeding along the cycle lanes - but this turned out not to be the case on observation.

Is anyone aware of where this has been tried out before - removal of non-compulsory cycle lanes to improve junction casualties - and what was the results? I do intend to bring the cycle community along with us.

keith baldock

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Response posted on 9th May 2017 by:
Jonathan

E: jonathan.mason@bristol.gov.uk
T:

Removal of cycle lanes

I wondered if the cycle lane is marked across the junctions or if it stops at the junction and continues again past it?


Response posted on 10th May 2017 by:
Will Cubbin

E: william.cubbin@essexhighways.org
T:

Removal of cycle lanes

Speaking as a cyclist (rather than a road safety analyst), I avoid the types of cycle lane you have described. Even if they have priority at side roads (many don't), where the drivers coming in from side roads do not have visual cues to give way I fear exactly the type of collision you have described. Personally I am much more comfortable in the main carriageway, preferably on a nice wide road with no potholes within 2m of the kerb.
Not everyone will agree with me, but in my experience faster riders will tend towards preferring the main carriageway and slower riders a dedicated cycle lane. Although all riders will prefer a cycle lane if it is of good enough quality (e.g. nice and wide, priority at junctions, good surface, fully segregated).
My recommendation would be to get input from a range of local cyclists who know the route, not just the keen-o enthusiasts.


Response posted on 10th May 2017 by:
Peter Swanwick

E: PeterSwanwick@southend.gov.uk
T: 01702215193

Removal of cycle lanes

In Southend we have a couple of shared space schemes where we have reduced or removed as much as possible all lines and signs. These schemes have had their critics but casualty rates have decreased. We have found that without segregated lanes drivers/riders/pedestrians are less territorial and hence more tolerant of other road users. People say these schemes are so dangerous and they have to drive/ride so slowly, but by creating an environment that appears to be more dangerous drivers/riders are more cautious.


Response posted on 10th May 2017 by:
Joe Walker

E: joe.walker@kirklees.gov.uk
T:

Removal of cycle lanes

It is refreshing to hear someone raise this problem, and it is an over-simplification to assume cycle lanes automatically make cycling safer. We have similar problems, and have highlighted the issue when safety auditing potential schemes.
I have yet to see an effective solution to the problem, even when discussing the issue with cycle lane 'specialists'.
For the same reason, I am also very concerned about the potential for allowing m/cycles into bus lanes where side roads / vehicle accesses are present. However, my experience is that the issue is often seen as an inconvenient truth which hinders a wider political agenda. I do however take the opportunity to raise the problem whenever possible!


Response posted on 11th May 2017 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Removal of cycle lanes

Please seek advice from TfL on a good solution. Consider attending one of the relevant courses that Urban Design London run, and look at the London Cycle Design Standards.

A crucial aspect to consider is whether you are trying to get many more journeys cycled in line with health, pollution and climate change guidance. If so you need to provide appealing and convenient routes for existing non-cyclists - children going to school, grandma going to the shops. Research shows they prefer to be separate to high volumes of traffic, lorries etc. Do parents happily let their children cycle along the road now. Will removing the cycle lane mean they will?

Finally, consider continuous doorways across junctions (ask John Dales at Urban Movement about Clapham Old Town), and filtering side roads where access/exit can be made at a safer point.


Response posted on 13th May 2017 by:
Peter Seymour

E: Rep@ReadingMAG.Org.uk
T:

Removal of cycle lanes

After much pressure from the cycling lobby itself, similar cycle lanes on the Wokingham road were reluctantly removed, but only after the Ombudsman ruled against the council. They were unsafe for the same reasons outlined and were clearly put in under politically correct pressure.
I am not aware of any traffic accidents as a result of their removal, and everybody seems much happier without them.


Response posted on 15th May 2017 by:
Patrick Lingwood

E: patrick.lingwood@bedford.gov.uk
T: 01234 276328

Removal of cycle lanes

You give insufficient data to offer advice - the name of the road would have been helpful.

On the one hand, cycle lanes across junctions do not bring any safety benefit and may at times bring safety disbenefits. We by default mark the cycle symbol [1057] in front of the Give Way marking of the side junction and on high flow side roads, surface the cycle lane in green across the junction, to balance up this disadvantage.

On the other hand, surveys show that continuous cycle lanes are popular with cyclists especially along busy trafficked roads. I will be presenting on what kind of infrastructure cyclists say they want at the Transport Practitioners Conference in Nottingham on 28th/29th June.

So it is a question of professional judgement and depends very much on the location, for instance parking, traffic speeds, cycle flows, widths, queuing etc.


Response posted on 17th May 2017 by:
keith baldock

E: keith.baldock@brighton-hove.gov.uk
T: 01273292258

Removal of cycle lanes

Many thanks for your replies. Food for thought and I may be in touch with you if I may.
All the best


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