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Help requested posted on 27th June 2016:

THINK! Country Roads Campaign: seeking local insights to help shape the 2016 campaign

The THINK! country road campaign has for the last two years been encouraging drivers to watch out for unexpected hazards and to break before the bend. GPS/Cameras in a sample of young driver cars show that pre and post campaign activity drivers aged 25-34 reduced their speed into bends; drivers aged 18-24 didn’t. We’re exploring how we can shake the complacency of that younger driver cohort, who typically are most resistant to safety messages.

We’re looking to shock them out of their complacency, but not through a hard hitting ad that shows blood and devastation. Rather, we’re looking for an insight/thought that might make a young male stop in his tracks and think. We’ve already spoken to a few RSOs and fire officers to explore what happens in an accident on a rural road. We’d welcome however any wider insights from others across the country – research or experienced based – of something you feel has resonated with/jolted our young male audience. Please reply on this thread or direct to: david.murphy@dft.gsi.gov.uk

David Murphy

Reply to this request


Response posted on 27th June 2016 by:
Michael Abbott

E: mike@advancedridercoaching.com
T:

18-24 aged drivers

I asked on a Chimp Paradox course how best to approach the young rider training we do for this age group, and the answer was 'good luck'. The theory is this group are designed to ignore adults as part of human evolution - the kids leave to spread the gene pool, so you are up against nature here. Might be worth talking to Dr Peters or a psychologist to get an insight and see what strategy might work. Shock tactics and reasoning probably won't. I think young drivers ought to be made aware of the illusion of safety being in a tin box, and maybe the harm that they could cause to others? One local motorcycle trainers simply tells young riders that the advantage of dying young is you don't get any older, but think of all the p*ssy you'd be missing. About as politically inappropriate as you can get, but I have seen the way they react and it does seem to make them think. Would be an interesting advertising campaign.


Response posted on 28th June 2016 by:
Colin Baird

E: cbaird@eastlothian.gov.uk
T:

Country Roads

Check out the recent Road Safety Scotland "country roads" campaign http://dontriskit.info/country-roads/view-the-campaign/


Response posted on 28th June 2016 by:
Stuart Geddes

E: geddess@stirling.gov.uk
T:

18-24 aged drivers

I appreciate you are trying to engage with a difficult to reach age group, but 'shock' tactics have been shown to ineffective, so I would avoid that.

Psychologists really need to be involved, but it would take a heck of a campaign to overcome frontal lobe development, particularly for young males.

I would echo Colin's suggestion to look at Road Safety Scotland's campaigns of recent years and the research behind the move away from 'shock'. Whether they have been effective for this age group or not is another question.


Response posted on 28th June 2016 by:
Rhiannon leeds

E: rhiannon.leeds@lancashire.gov.uk
T:

peer to peer

We've done a lot of activities and discussion that included peer to peer elements which seemed to have a good effect.
A lot of our research showed that use of real life situations helped them realise the severity of their risk taking. Young males do have empathy.
Keen to be involved in the development and use of a possible initiative.


Response posted on 28th June 2016 by:
Chris Fossey

E: chrisfossey@warwickshire.gov.uk
T:

THINK! Country Roads Campaign: seeking local insights to help shape the 2016 campaign

We found the right communication tool helped in a recent campaign so using facebook and media streaming services such as spotify advertising works well and seemed to have a good effect on the collision stats. amongst young people for the months the campaign was running.

Having said that, this is a cultural issue more than anything else. If you've never been involved in a car crash you have to ask yourself why and what motivated you to drive differently to anyone else.


Response posted on 30th June 2016 by:
Andrew Fraser

E: andrew.fraser@falkirk.gov.uk
T:

THINK! Country Roads Campaign

I have already written to Mr Murphy, expressing my surprise at the question, and pointing out that the solution to the young driver's problem will only be addressed properly when we introduce Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL).

It's not shocking or jolting that young drivers require, it's experience within a lower-risk environment.

Perhaps the "THINK" campaign ought to be shocked/jolted into campaigning for GDL!


Response posted on 30th June 2016 by:
Bob Craven

E: rcraven@toucansurf.com
T:

young drivers on bends.

Nothing has been mentioned about the amount of training a learner driver gets on country roads. It is already understood that it is insufficient as is motorway driving and driving at night. It appears we train only enbough to pass the driving test and that is fatal. Many motorcyclists as an example do dangerous things because they have no knowledege of the dangers they face on country roads and the like. I would like to see country road driving as well as motorway and night time and try to include inclement weather as part of the training and set over a year from passing the test. This way training doesnt stop at the test but continues, say on green plates, over a period of a year. At the moment we have a young person in charge of at least half a ton of metal taking his mates out for a meal and no doubt a drink to a pub. in the country. A set up for carnage on our roads. Lets also remember from previous notifications that many. if not the majority of incidents on country road involve youngsters that need a car beacause they live out there in the country.


Response posted on 30th June 2016 by:
Bob Craven

E: rcraven@toucansurf.com
T:

bends in the country

Another point of view is that others also suffer from the inability to take bends.Of which youngsters are only a %. Drivers of any age can and do come unstuck and also some motorcycists fail to recognise the severity of bends and also come a cropper.
Bends that have signage, shevrons, solid white line have usually seen accidents before and thats why there is signage, warnings etc. Yet still incidents occur. Maybe some bends are pre signed in this way and some are not. Some L.A.s seem to prefer a plethera of signage and painted lines all over the place and others so they become common place and sometimes, well maybe they have run out of paint or dont recognise the dangers of bends and therefore do not sign. There needs to be a National recognised attitude to signage otherwise from area to area there will be danger that drivers/riders do not anticipate.

Further it would be my recomendation that all signed bends would have some other form of additional signage that would indicate its severity and danger.

This can be easily achieved by first placing a small yellow and black shevron sign the size of a cars number plate on the post situated prior to the bend. It would have on it one to four black shevrons each one depicting to a lesser or greater degree the possible danger of that particular bend. ie one shevron being a slight bend of minimal risk and four shevrons being the greatest danger of all,being, say a severe reducing radious, By publicity and education drivers would recognise this, slow and take the bends with greater caution accordingly. The shevrons on the actual bend itself can also re iterate and re enforce the severity of the bend being again of one to four shevrons lon g and maybe repeated round the bend. When it comes to bends many incidents occur due to inapropriate speed upon apprach and entering. Unification of a system designed to inform as this would could to my mind help in reducing risk. The costs would be minimal and would give a greater return in terms of deaths and injuries associated with bends.


Response posted on 7th July 2016 by:
Ian Edwards

E: ian.edwards@edrivingsolutions.com
T:

Young Driver on Bends

There is a number of possible issue at play here:

I know I can die but it won't happen to me
I am not fully aware of the limitation of the vehicle
I am not fully aware of the limitation of the road surface
I am not fully aware of the relationship between speed and force
I am trying to achieve something other than getting from point A to B safely
I do not recognise rural roads as being dangerous - how can they be - they have the high speed limit
Etc.

These are off the top of my head and there a more. What is need is to clearly understand which and what combination of these points is influencing the behaviour and proceed accordingly. What I would recommend would be the development of a game type approach, that teaches young drivers how to judge their speed on approach to a bend, this would be relatively simple to develop.

Happy to help further,

Ian

New View Consultants Ltd
www.nvc-limited.com


Response posted on 14th July 2016 by:
Will Cubbin

E: william.cubbin@essexhighways.org
T:

Young drivers on country roads

The premise that “drivers aged 25-34 reduced their speed into bends; drivers aged 18-24 didn’t” is certainly consistent with work I’ve done on driver age and road type, so the aims of the initiative would be worthwhile for Essex.

The little I’ve read around the sociology and psychology of why people, especially young males, behave anti socially (e.g. violent crime, drug taking, dangerous driving, rebellious haircuts) all point towards a combined need for a feeling of high status, and a pathological fear of humiliation. Although I’m not sure about the 1% of the population who are psychopaths (NOT the same as a serial killer). So a few ideas I’ve had based on this are:
> Point out that racing drivers (i.e. high status) slow down for corners!
> Portray high status individuals looking cool, posing in cars, and going slow so people can admire them AND Contrast with low status individuals smashed up in a ditch with girls laughing at them feeling humiliated.
> Prove how quick you are at driving – go karting with your mates (can local karting tracks do a discount for people who engage with road safety education)
> Message: Get it wrong on a country lane, you might kill yourself or your passengers, you might only get injured, you might even walk away, but all the people in the traffic jam you create will think what a terrible driver you are. It might sound glib to imply that the main thing to worry about when driving too fast is that people will laugh at you. But the message “Not only will you die, but you will be humiliated” does appear to be the message any would-be high-school shooters need to receive. These individuals all seem to share the idea that a killing spree at their school is the only way to save face following some real or perceived humiliation. None seem to fear death as most kill themselves or get the cops to do it, so the fear of humiliation in these very extreme cases has overridden their fear of being shot dead. Humiliation is a very powerful thing, and a very dangerous thing. No individual person should ever be humiliated, just like nobody should be injured or killed. But I think using the fear of humiliation in the same way as the fear of death/injury could be a way of getting through to people who see road death as something that happens to other people.


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