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Help requested posted on 29th April 2016:

Year 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

Has anybody tried to deliver practical pedestrian training for year 6 pupils with a view to the transition to high school? If so what aspects and activities were covered and was it of value to the children and successful?

Richard Wiseman

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Response posted on 29th April 2016 by:
Carla Lowe

E: clowe@westminster.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

I deliver pedestrian training for years 2 through to 6. For year 6, I facilitate a lesson first that discusses ZIP Oyster cards and mapping exercises by bus, tube, walking and/or cycling.
I then facilitate an on-road session that includes reviewing their knowledge of a safer crossing place, crossing at junctions and bus stop and tube discussion i.e. spider maps, bus stop columns, ticket offices, dealing with diversions and so on and so forth.
I take about 30-40 minutes with a group of upto 6 pupils and 2 additional adults.
Some schools have particular concerns about certain roads and areas and I will incorporate them (where possible) into the on-road session.

I'm happy to discuss the scheme with you further.


Response posted on 29th April 2016 by:
James Marsh

E: james@b3online.co.uk
T:

Year 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

Hi Richard

We've provided a number of councils with resources to help school transition, often delivered as part of Junior Citizens: Westminster (for Carla above!), Enfield, Lewisham, Brent, Southwark, Solihull and other West Midlands authorities.

The resources include:
Magazines - all about transition, safety, route planning etc
Activity booklets - quizzes, jokes etc to re-enforce information learned on Jun Citzs day in a fun way
Banners - creating a six-part CSI-type scenario that takes children through road safety issues and what they can do to avoid dangerous situations
Lesson plans - both print and digital that teachers can you use to revisit the subject area a couple of weeks after a Jun Citzs event

From feedback, many RSOs seem to deliver these sessions at the beginning of Yr 6 (before the pressure of SATs begins) or after the summer half term break (when the SATs are over).

Let me know if you would like to see any of these resources or contacts at the councils who use them.

Good luck!
James


Response posted on 29th April 2016 by:
Chi Ming Lai

E: cm.lai@hertfordshire.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Transition Road Safety

In Hertfordshire, we focus practical Pedestrian Skills on Year 4 as we find with Year 6, it is their attitude towards road safety issues that is of most concern. So we run workshops with Year 6 on the issue of distraction from mobile devices while walking.

This involves a practical exercise using mobile phones to prove that using them makes easy tasks much more difficult and a discussion following viewing our dramatised film 'C U Later' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJgIeRP4tp0

A reinforcement activity where pupils design their own poster on the distractions issue and present the finished product to their classmates completes the programme.

The programme has been evaluated using an attitudinal questionnaire based on the Likert scale and over the last 5 years with data acquired from 590 Year 6 pupils, the mean improvement in attitude is +5.9%

I hope that helps


Response posted on 4th May 2016 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Yr 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

Check your Bikeability trainers understand and can include safe road crossing in their teaching. Sadly most schools I work in do L2 in year 5 rather than yr6. Never mind cycling on the road, most pupils have very little experience of independently walking across a road. A key learning outcome for me is that the pupils demonstrate they can choose a good place to cross and move to where they can see to make a decision. Consistently, confidently and competently doing road cycling skills with traffic in year 5 is an irregular bonus outcome!


Response posted on 4th May 2016 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Yr 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

Check your Bikeability trainers understand and can include safe road crossing in their teaching. Sadly most schools I work in do L2 in year 5 rather than yr6. Never mind cycling on the road, most pupils have very little experience of independently walking across a road. A key learning outcome for me is that the pupils demonstrate they can choose a good place to cross and move to where they can see to make a decision. Consistently, confidently and competently doing road cycling skills with traffic in year 5 is an irregular bonus outcome!


Response posted on 4th May 2016 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Yr 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

Check your Bikeability trainers understand and can include safe road crossing in their teaching. Sadly most schools I work in do L2 in year 5 rather than yr6. Never mind cycling on the road, most pupils have very little experience of independently walking across a road. A key learning outcome for me is that the pupils demonstrate they can choose a good place to cross and move to where they can see to make a decision. Consistently, confidently and competently doing road cycling skills with traffic in year 5 is an irregular bonus outcome!


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
claire stone

E: claire.stone@essexhighways.org
T:

Yr 6 Practical Pedestrian Training

We carried out year 6 pedestrian training for many years, which was also evaluated.

The training was split into two sections-A 30 minute classroom questionnaire, then outside for approx. 20 mins.
The questionnaire covered-
Pedestrian safety:
Crossing the road and pedestrian crossings
Dangers of crossing in-front or behind buses and large vehicles
Distractions (head phones, mobiles and friends)
Junctions
Reversing vehicles
Stopping distances
Crossing between parked cars

A3 photos are used and short videos to support the questionnaire.

Cycle safety covered-
Helmets

In-car safety covered-
Booster seats
Seatbelts
Sitting in the front of vehicles (air bags)
Dangers of distracting their driver

After the questionnaire, the children were taken outside to put into practice some of the sections from the questionnaire, such as-
Crossing the road
Junctions
Reversing vehicles and driveways
Crossing between parked cars
The stopping distance at 30mph is paced out on the path.

At the end, the children are given the 'Think' journey planner to complete, which is a risk assessment of the route to their new secondary school.

The evaluation showed that the majority of children will now think about their own Road Safety, with the majority benefiting from both the inside and outside sessions. All surveyed showed they had learnt certain areas of Road Safety from the activity.

Hope this helps.

Claire Stone


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 5th May 2016 by:
Helen Griffiths

E: h.l.griffiths@npt.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

Hi

I do classroom chats with Year 6 focussing on distractions, attitude and behaviour and follow this up with practical training at the road side. We focus on looking at safe places, moving away from obstructions where possible and also crossing safely between parked cars.
Hope this helps.


Response posted on 6th May 2016 by:
Fiona

E: fiona.lacrette@camden.gov.uk
T:

Year 6 Pedestrian Training

At Camden we target Year 5 children for pedestrian skills training rather than Year 6 in order to reach children before secondary school during their growing independence. However, we have conducted the training with Year 6 pupils in relation to specific concerns/requests.

Children are engaged in one or two 30 minute road side sessions. Children are taught how to use zebra crossings , pelican crossings, traffic islands and other designated crossings near the school and how to cross if there are no such facilities. Crossing between parked cars is also discussed( should they find no safer place) and taking care at pavement crossovers . Driver behaviour is discussed throughout the training.

Our initial on-road assessments indicate good retention of knowledge and skills ( approx 3 months after).


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