Help Forum

Help requested posted on 26th February 2016:

Distractions

I am planning on running a 2 hour workshop on the subject of distractions in 2017 - this will be related to driving PCV and the associated risks. Rather than death by Powerpoint, I am interested in any 'off the wall' ideas on how the subject matter can be addressed to hit home the dangers of the various forms of distraction.

Ray Cowpe

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Response posted on 26th February 2016 by:
PeterWilson

E: pwilson@westminster.gov.uk
T:

distractions

have a look at this that I use with children and maybe you could create an exercise on internal and external distractions by making lists and discussing how many appear on delegates lists.
https://jillkuzma.files.wordpress.com/2012/12/distractor-types.pdf
They need to understand what distracters are – then progress toward having them identify what kinds of distracters may be more prevalent for them individually. I teach them about “outside the brain distracters” – environmental influences and “inside the brain distracters” – cognitive or emotional influences on attention to the task in hand.This could be worry family issues, almost every day stiff like what they will have for their next meal!
If you have access to IT try the THINK challenge
http://think.direct.gov.uk/drivingchallenge/
Google distraction activities and a lot will appear on youtube.
Alternatively give your delegates a couple of simple tasks to do like walk a line taped to the floor (including bends and junctions whilst reading aloud from a book.


Response posted on 26th February 2016 by:
Keith Baldock

E: keith.baldock@brighton-hove.gov.uk
T:

Distractions

Hi
Done sessions with new driving students. Used the GEM drop and catch reaction time leaflets in front of audience with a vicitm doing it concentrating then when in conversation with me. Also done it with a couple of people conversing on focussed subject, then having third person chipping in to one of the people in conversation with face close to that person.
Found the TfL videos - Whodunnit -
and test your awareness good for illustrating focus - old but good.
I also get into emotional distractions and effect it has on limbic system/brain - doing a bit of drama as a caveman seeing a sabre tooth tiger as to where our fight / flight system comes from. That is off the wall. Good luck - look forward to other responses as I want ideas on this!


Response posted on 26th February 2016 by:
Paul Richardson

E: prichardson@scotborders.gov.uk
T:

Distractions

We used to use the 'Say the colour not the word exercise' which most people find requires a lot of concentration. Whilst they are doing this start asking them questions. What did they have fror breafast. What time did they get up that morning. whats their plans for the weekend. The aim is for them to realise a task like driving requires alot of concentration but it is very diffcult to get things right when constantly distracted for example by a telephoe conversation.


Response posted on 26th February 2016 by:
Will Cubbin

E: william.cubbin@essexhighways.org
T:

Distractions

There's a good video made by the Belgians on YouTube here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbjSWDwJILs


Response posted on 26th February 2016 by:
Andrew Sykes

E: andrew.sykes@norfolk.gov.uk
T:

Distractions

We use a Battack device to demonstrate how ineffective we are at divided attention tasks. The device measures reaction times and then we add a simple distraction exercise and the results speak for themselves. A great message which is fun to use.


Response posted on 28th February 2016 by:
Robert

E: Robert.Swears@opus.co.nz
T:

Distractions

The moonwalking bear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6qcgoay4 and blue 2s videos are good for demonstrating that when you're focused on one thing you can miss something that's very obvious if you're not distracted.


Response posted on 29th February 2016 by:
April French

E: april.french@bromley.gov.uk
T:

Distractions

Perhaps you could do a variation of the Volkswagen 'Eyes on the Road' cinema advert/experiment found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3a-hOwPLxQ

This would depend on the size of your delegate group and if you can find a way to make it work. If delegates are in small groups doing an exercise, you could send a group text to some or all of them to see if they immediately go for phone. Then poll them/discuss how many did and how it affected their concentration on the assigned exercise.


Response posted on 3rd March 2016 by:
JACKIE BOYLE

E: jackie.boyle@westsussex.gov.uk
T:

DISTRACTION

We use a driving simulator where we get the driver to drive around London normally and then get them to do it again, answering their phone or texting, or we have their friends distract them. They very quickly see how dangerous distraction can be.


Response posted on 3rd March 2016 by:
Mike Harrison

E: mike@mikeharrisondrivinginstructor.co.uk
T:

Distractions for PCV Drivers

Hi if you want to ring me for anecdotal examples, from several years of Coach/Bus Driving. Also although you may be distracted you are still using your peripheral vision, and your overriding responsibility to the 'safety and comfort' of your passengers means that you learn to 'ignore' distractions in critical situations. Not sure how you can out that across in a presentation though!


Response posted on 9th March 2016 by:
Rod King

E: Rod.k@20splenty.org
T:

Distractions by word, sentence

Do a work shop asking for some sample words, phrases and sentences. Then get the group to work out number of seconds for each. Then work out distance for each at 20mph(9m/sec) and 40mph (18m/sec). Then pace out distance travelled for each word, phrase or sentence!


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