Help Forum

Help requested posted on 4th February 2016:

Interactive resources

We would like links and ideas to physical interactive engagement ideas and resources to use with 14-19 year olds. These aren't online or PC based ideas, more hands on, workshop style or physical ideas. To cover most of the important subjects inc distraction, responsibility and awareness. I would appreciate any ideas for 1-10 people no matter how big or small.

Alan Faulkner Kent Fire and Rescue

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Response posted on 5th February 2016 by:
Keith Gammon

E: enquiries@buzzroadsafetyed.com
T:

Road Safety Workshops

Please visit my website www.buzzroadsafetyed.com and view my work. Maybe I can assist.
Keith Gammon AMRSGB


Response posted on 5th February 2016 by:
James Backshall

E: james.backshall@colas.co.uk
T:

Interactive Resources

I will be running a workshop with similar age groups at a school in Surry,

I will be using a car, filling the inside with Distractions that young drives may encounter. e.g.

Mobile phone in a holder, sat nav on the windscreen, rubbish in the passenger footwell, football and other objects that can move around on the back seat, music on loud etc.

I will get the students in the car and get them to talk about the distractions and how/why distractions can course incidents.

I also use a car with a number of defects, Bold tyres, flat tyres, broken number plate, brake light broken, windscreen wiper missing etc. the students have to find as many defects as they can in a set time.

There is also some really good reaction tests, very simple using a ruler, hold and drop then try and catch it again. http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/biology_oops/


Please feel free to email me direct for more information.


Response posted on 5th February 2016 by:
Keith Baldock

E: keith.baldock@brighton-hove.gov.uk
T:

Interactive resources

I too have used the drop test - GEM do a good little flyer with this on it (free to RS people) , We've also incorporated it into a leaflet youth workers at Brighton and Hove Albion in Community use in their project work - ask if you want copy. I use a catapult from the DIMS seatbelt display set - fires a t.tennis ball at 30mph or so, to test reactions - do this on countdown and when conversing - illustrating mobile phone. Also have drink and drug goggles to use etc and do various things with that. They just have to agree not to sue me.


Response posted on 5th February 2016 by:
Honor Byford

E: Honor.Byford@northyorks.gov.uk
T:

Interactive Resources

We run Drive Alive, which is a one day, Multi-agency event at key target schools which is essentially a Junior Citizen/Crucial Crew event for Year 11/12. With the students in groups, they go from stand to stand working on a different subject, scenario or issue at each one. It is very interactive - we don't let them get away with being a passive audience. We cover drink/drugs and driving including the beer goggles; first aid;how to choose a driving instructor, what is involved in learning to drive including insurance; collision investigation;passenger power with peer group pressures and responsibility. We end with a presentation from the parents of a young man who died just weeks after passing his test - his Dad is also a retired Head Teacher so very good with a school hall full of students, which does help. This is a labour intensive day and it requires the school to allow their Y11 or 12 students to take part in a whole days events but it is only provided to high priority schools. We organise as Local Authority RS team, working with FRS, Police and other providers. Happy to discuss further if you are interested. tel 01609 532616


Response posted on 8th February 2016 by:
April French

E: april.french@bromley.gov.uk
T:

Interactive Resources

As part of Road Safety Education talks, I frequently use an exercise that's popular and striking with many age groups. I've used this successfully with students aged 9-18.
Standing at the front of the group, I ask if anyone knows how far a car going 30mph on a dry day will travel before it comes to a complete stop (usually saying it's because one of their friends wasn't thinking and ran out in the road). I choose several volunteers who think they know the answer and bring them to the front of the group.
Standing at a starting point where I pretend to be the car, I ask them to stand somewhere in front of me in a straight line, wherever they think I'll stop. Their distances usually vary wildly, and they'll then tend to try to readjust according to where their mates stand. I tell them they have to stick with their first choice.
Next, I'll walk off the distance, saying one large step is a metre (explaining that in this scenario, I'm a car, not a measuring tape, so it's *approximately* a metre). As I reach each student at their chosen point, I explain their odds of survival based on how far along the stopping journey I've travelled. I choose who will live and who won't or what injuries they might sustain. As I often do this in schools, I'll then ask 'Sir' or 'Miss' to make the phone call to the student's family, explaining that they're on the way to hospital or worse.
Students are inevitably shocked at the braking distance alone, let alone the complete distance. I reinforce just how far it is by getting them to really look and consider how far my starting point is from where I finish.
In a small group, I'll often go through this exercise then have the entire group actually walk off the distance behind me, leaving the teacher at the starting point for visual reference.
It's a simple exercise, but very powerful.


Response posted on 8th February 2016 by:
Steve Ferris

E: steve@roadsafetyanalysis.org
T:

Young Driver Resource

We have been running a young drivers scheme in Berkshire for a number of years, however have recently evaluated it using a new set of measures around behaviour. We found that it was actually causing harm by normalising bad behaviours and poor practice. By talking about risky decision making and the like, in relation to young drivers it normalises the behaviour, and tells them 'this is what young drivers do.'

As part of the data we've taken from national schemes, local schemes and a number of focus groups with 15-19 year olds; we've redeveloped a program based on positive messaging and reinforcement, masked in amongst workshops that they feel have value, and are developed around the latest behaviour change techniques.

Simply giving them tools with no environment in which to use them, just doesn't work. Our program is aiming to alter and improve that environment and social standards among them and their peer groups so that it doesn't just stop when the event has ended.

This worked as a great selling feature to interested commercial parties who were interested in fulfilling their social responsibility mandates. Meaning that because of their investment, the program effectively will pay for and run itself.

Currently it's running for a capacity of 32 at a time, however this has been designed to be completely scalable to be used in a number of different situations.

We will be releasing a full report later this year including results and the evaluation of the new program. In the mean time I'd be happy to discuss it further.

Steve Ferris
RSA
01295 731816


Response posted on 21st February 2016 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Young Driver Resource

Provide Bikeability L3 training and emphasise the value of practising using the roads as a cyclist in preparation for driver training. Having gained an understanding of safe cycling principles and familiarity with travelling and decision making on road, the transition to managing a car on the road should be easier. In addition the affordability and practicality of a cycle becomes apparent as does the poor behaviour of some drivers. All good learning!


Response posted on 21st February 2016 by:
Charlie Holland

E: Charlie@palaceofvariety.co.uk
T:

Young Driver Resource

Provide Bikeability L3 training and emphasise the value of practising using the roads as a cyclist in preparation for driver training. Having gained an understanding of safe cycling principles and familiarity with travelling and decision making on road, the transition to managing a car on the road should be easier. In addition the affordability and practicality of a cycle becomes apparent as does the poor behaviour of some drivers. All good learning!


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