Help Forum

Help requested posted on 24th April 2012:

Advertising and Crashes

Does anyone have evidence of links between roadside advertising and crashes? We are coming under increasing pressure to approve requests for large (sometimes scrolling) Decaux advertising, as they bring revenue into the City. We have identified at least one site where crashes are occurring, which did not have a record prior to the installation of one of these boards and were wondering whether any other Authorities have experienced similar.

Carol Bagshaw
Southampton City Council

Reply to this request


Response posted on 24th April 2012 by:
Tim Philpot
Wolverhampton City Council Road Safety Team
E: tim.philpot@wolverhampton.gov.uk
T: 01902 555465

Roadside advertising

I looked into this matter in 2009. The Highways Agency published a report in June 2008 on "The Impact of Roadside Advertising on Driver Distraction". This report acknowledged that there was currently insufficient research to provide a robust system for assessing what does and what does not constitute a distraction. Consequently, establishing an absolute position on this is matter is difficult.
At a local level although there was concern about this type of advertising being installed, I am not aware of this translating into collisions. Your best bet is to get into a good working relationship with your planning dept and ask to comment on such applications, so if you have any reservations they can be raised.


Response posted on 24th April 2012 by:
Andrew Fraser
Falkirk Council
E: andrew.fraser@falkirk.gov.uk
T: 01324 504931

External to vehicle driver distractionr

Carol,

I sympathise. I simply cannot understand why we allow the deliberate distraction of drivers by outdoor advertisers.

You may wish to look at the following:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/08/17916/24495

http://www.mendeley.com/research/visual-clutter-externaltovehicle-driver-distraction/

http://www.reesjeffreys.co.uk/reports/Roadside%20distractions%20final%20report%20%28Brunel%29.pdf

... and be aware that the Signs Regulations do not permit scrolling or multiple page traffic signs.

You're not alone:

http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/jun2007/id20070618_505580.htm

Unfortunately, money talks ... safety, amenity and health do not.

Kind regards,


Andrew.


Response posted on 24th April 2012 by:
Matt Staton
Cambridgeshire County Council
E: matt.staton@cambridgeshire.gov.uk
T: 01223699652

Research on distraction by advertising

Carol,

Further to Andrew and Tim's suggestions, I found the following research into billboards/advertising very useful when conducting a research project on driver distraction:

Chattington, M. et al., 2009, Investigating Driver Distraction: The Effects of Video and Static Advertising: A Driving Simulator Study, TRL Client Project Report 208, TRL Ltd.

Crundall, D., van Loon, E. & Underwood, G., 2006, ‘Attraction and distraction of attention with roadside advertisements’, [online pdf] Accident Analysis and Prevention 38. Available at: http://www.psychology.nottingham.ac.uk/staff/dec/references/Crundall%20et%20al%202006.pdf

Young, M.S. & Mahfound, J.M., 2007, Driven to Distraction: Determining the effects of Roadside Advertising on Driver Attention, Ergonomics Research Group Report, Uxbridge, UK: Brunel University.

The fact that you have a site which it appears may demonstrate the theory in practice is certainly of significant importance. There would certainly be a few people interested if you can substantiate the link.

I hope that helps?

Matt


Response posted on 24th April 2012 by:
Dr Martin Langham
User Perspective Ltd
E: martin@userperspective.co.uk
T: 01273 704432

adverts

Hi Carol

I agree with the others. The references are good ones and from memory Mark Chattington's work showed video adverts were a small issue. Mark, Mark Young, and David Crundall are all human factors people. Human Factors is that bit of science between Psychology and Engineering. I would commission one of them to do a review of your sites and get Hampshire Police to do a review Hampshire RPU have been trained in Human Factors by me! They know their stuff as the questions they ask are always clever!
Mark C is at TRL, Mark Young was at Brunel and might be back at Southampton Uni, and David is at Nottingham. Say you have got details from me and they should help. They are all nice people.
Overall I doubt if the adverts are a problem but have a look at your data and engage a human factors person. Happy to help as I'm in the next county.
Send me a private message via User Perspective website if you need more.
Martin
Dr Martin Langham
www.userperspective.co.uk


Response posted on 24th April 2012 by:
Diane Pearson
Driver & Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)
E: diane.pearson@dsa.gsi.gov.uk
T: 0115 936 6042

Advertising and Crashes

http://www.highways.gov.uk/knowledge_compendium/assets/documents/Portfol
io/The%20impact%20of%20roadside%20advertising%20on%20the%20travelling%20
public%20-%20Report%20-%201103.pdf

Try this link to a survey carried out by Highways Agency in 2008.

Diane Pearson


Response posted on 25th April 2012 by:
Steve Harrison
North East Lincolnshire Council
E: steve.harrison@northlincs.gov.uk
T: n/a

Advertising and Crashes

Our signs policy review is aiming to help prevent or reduce the spread of this type of advertising. I haven't found any sites where advertising has been identified as a dominant factor, however, my only crash was when I rear shunted a car at a roundabout when looking at an illegal advert I had asked the owner to remove!!


Response posted on 30th April 2012 by:
Michael Elliott
Stirling Council
E: elliottm@stirling.gov.uk
T: 01786 442441

Advertising and road traffic accidents

Carol,

Advertising is specifically designed to attract attention, why else would the advertiser pay for it, therefore if it does attract a driver's attention it must be taking his/her attention away from the primary task of driving safely.
Unfortuneately it is very difficult to obtain hard evidence of distraction as a contributory factor causing road traffic accidents. How many drivers admit to having been distracted. Evidence may be buried in drivers' subconsciouses - the driver may not even be aware that he/she was distracted in the moment precipitating his/her road traffic accident.
Static advertising is bad but moving advertising has to potential to hold a drivers attention making such very dangerous.


Response posted on 30th April 2012 by:
Michael Elliott
Stirling Council
E: elliottm@stirling.gov.uk
T: 01786 442441

Advertising and road traffic accidents

Carol,

Advertising is specifically designed to attract attention, why else would the advertiser pay for it, therefore if it does attract a driver's attention it must be taking his/her attention away from the primary task of driving safely.
Unfortuneately it is very difficult to obtain hard evidence of distraction as a contributory factor causing road traffic accidents. How many drivers admit to having been distracted. Evidence may be buried in drivers' subconsciouses - the driver may not even be aware that he/she was distracted in the moment precipitating his/her road traffic accident.
Static advertising is bad but moving advertising has to potential to hold a drivers attention making such very dangerous.


Response posted on 30th April 2012 by:
Michael Elliott
Stirling Council
E: elliottm@stirling.gov.uk
T: 01786 442441

Advertising and crashes

Carol,

Advertising is specifically designed to attract attention, why else would the advertiser pay for it, therefore if it does attract a driver's attention it must be taking his/her attention away from the primary task of driving safely.
Unfortuneately it is very difficult to obtain hard evidence of distraction as a contributory factor causing road traffic accidents. How many drivers admit to having been distracted. Evidence may be buried in drivers' subconsciouses - the driver may not even be aware that he/she was distracted in the moment precipitating his/her road traffic accident.
Static advertising is bad but moving advertising has to potential to hold a drivers attention making such very dangerous.


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