Help Forum

Help requested posted on 26th August 2019:

ICE data for Cyclists

This could be considered relevant to all road users but having a vehicle registration is likely to mitigate the problem. So my question relates to cyclists. Following an RTC, a cyclist carrying no identification or information on medical conditions and who is seriously-injured may not be treated quickly enough, or correctly if there are underlying medical conditions. Has anyone come out with a cyclist-friendly ICE contact idea?

Michael McDonnell

Reply to this request


Response posted on 27th August 2019 by:
Keith Baldock

E: keith.baldock@brighton-hove.gov.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Sussex Safer Roads partnership have used Cerql ICE stickers - QR code linking to cloud data - for cyclists as well as the main target of motorcyclists. Sticker goes on helmet.
Very limited uptake - but not heavily pushed to cyclists as P2W much higher risk. https://www.cerql.co.uk/


Response posted on 27th August 2019 by:
David

E: d.langham@sky.com
T: 07305513800

ICE data for Cyclists

Good morning Michael
I am a motorcycle instructor and I attended a Biker Down course. At the end they gave me a Emergency Contact sheet which can then be stuck onto the side of my motorcycle helmet. The information contained within is Contact details for the next of kin, blood group and any illnesses and any medication you are currently taking. The information contained in the pouch would also stick to a cycle helmet, subject to one being worn.
Hope this helps. If needed I have a couple of spares and would be happy to forward them to you
Regards
Dave


Response posted on 27th August 2019 by:
David

E: d.langham@sky.com
T: 07305513800

ICE data for Cyclists

Good morning Michael
I am a motorcycle instructor and I attended a Biker Down course. At the end they gave me a Emergency Contact sheet which can then be stuck onto the side of my motorcycle helmet. The information contained within is Contact details for the next of kin, blood group and any illnesses and any medication you are currently taking. The information contained in the pouch would also stick to a cycle helmet, subject to one being worn.
Hope this helps. If needed I have a couple of spares and would be happy to forward them to you
Regards
Dave


Response posted on 27th August 2019 by:
Keith

E: kmillard@kierwsp.co.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

We have considered a simple, relatively cheap, safety idea called the Worker Safety Hard Hat ID tag. It is extremely durable, is not affected by extremes of temperature or weather and costs just 4.66 inc. vat each.

Visit the website for more information:
https://www.icetags.co.uk/VitalID-WSID-01-Worker-Emergency-ID


Response posted on 28th August 2019 by:
Em Tugwell-Smith

E: Emma.Tugwell-Smith@sussex.pnn.police.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

One of the main reasons Sussex Safer Roads Partnership offer the ICE stickers from CERQL is due to their cost. We pay 1 per sticker and give them away for free at Biker Down, Bike Safe, we also offer them to cyclists and horse riders. All the information is uploaded onto the CERQL website and can be accessed via the QR code in an emergency. The website also has the option to password protect copies of important travel and insurance docs. The stickers are durable and do not impair the helmet in anyway. We get quite a few cyclists requesting the stickers particularly for their children when they are about to start secondary school.


Response posted on 28th August 2019 by:
James Pearson-Jenkins

E: jpearsonjenkins@gmail.com
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Dear Michael,

I have been sent this post from a local forum I attend. It is a very interesting concept. I think my first port of call with this would be to consider the research around the impact of co-morbidities on people involved in trauma. Of course, there are many people living with many different chronic diseases who also maybe taking medications that can impact upon their resilience to trauma. I for example have a type of anaemia that can cause me to be dizzy and tired, so a fall from a bicycle could be caused by this; however, I am not sure if knowing this would alter my immediate care at the roadside, as the protocols would likely be to give me intravenous support via a cannula and high flow oxygen via a hudson mask. In hospital, a full blood screen would reveal my 'disease' and the appropriate treatment would be given.

To summarise, I think any provision of information to first aiders/ attenders can not hurt, however, if there is no real benefit to the scheme and it was going to divert funding away from other areas for road or cycle safety, then it would need more consideration.

I wonder if it is worth a poster at the UK national trauma conference to see if there is interest in research in this area?

Kind regards

James

James Pearson-Jenkins RN BSc (Hons) MSC HMHW PGDipEd PGCE RNT SFHEA
Registered Nurse/ Principal Lecturer/ Head of Academic Innovation.


Response posted on 28th August 2019 by:
Dermot McGonigle

E: dermot.mcgonigle@eastrenfrewshire.gov.uk
T: 01415773425

ICE data for Cyclists

Hi Michael, about 20 years ago I bought an "SOS" pendant which contains a folded strip of paper where the wearer records details they wish to be made available in case of an emergency - e.g. contacts & medical info. As I recall, it was intended for wearing when cycling, mountaineering etc. though I'm unsure if this product or anything similar is still available.


Response posted on 28th August 2019 by:
Tim Philpot

E: tim.philpot@wolverhampton.gov.uk
T: 07825530346

ICE data for Cyclists

I have received feedback from disabled cyclists who use an i-Phone app integral to the i-Phone. They trust it to carry details of some quite serious medical conditions. They think that apps for other phone types are also available. The challenges in using these however revolve around people coming to their assistance knowing the app is there and how to access it given the security featues on most phones.


Response posted on 29th August 2019 by:
Glen McArthur

E: glen.mcarthur@sussex.pnn.police.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

The issues surrounding the identification of a rider/driver/casualty, are not as straightforward as it may seem. Firstly we have the matter of correct identification of the person.
A registration system such as DVLA will obviously give the details of a registered keeper, but this is by no means 100% accurate as it is solely dependant on the accuracy of the data supplied.
We will routinely search other databases to ensure that the details of an injured rider/driver of a motor vehicle is that of the registered keeper. The advent of photocard driving licences has helped considerably.
If pedal cycles are then required to be registered, we fall back to the same problem of, is this the owner that is riding this bike at the relevant time?

QR codes and various Emergency decals are a great way to get deal with this issue, but it has been raised that manufacturers are concerned over the effect that the adhesive used by the 'stickers' has on the coatings of both motorcycle and cycle helmets, and the implications if the structure of the helmet is compromised over time.

Lastly, how would we, the emergency services, read the data? Our IT systems are so locked down for the obvious security risks, that for us to access or read data, any APP or technology must go through considerable testing to ensure it is safe for us to use. Some mobile phones have the ICE (In Case of Emergency) facility, but having the knowledge on how to access all the different brands is another hurdle.
With so many variations of storing the vital data that could be needed at the scene of a medical incident, how do we choose one over the others?

I am both a motorcyclist and a cyclist, so I will watch this topic with active interest.


Response posted on 29th August 2019 by:
Derek C Donald

E: d.c.donald@btinternet.com
T: 01463 792154

ICE data for Cyclists

Michael, the SOS Pendant referred to by Dermot McGonigle is still available, and I had worn one for many, many years and recently purchased two new inserts as the original had become almost unreadable due to continuing updating. I will look out the spare I have, scan it and email it to you.


Response posted on 30th August 2019 by:
mottershaw stuart

E: stuart.mottershaw7309@leicestershire.pnn.police.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

As a keen cyclist who suffered a catastrophic cardiac arrest after a ride in 2016 I now wear a OneLife ID wrist band.

Its a rubber strap (various colours available) with a metal portion that has a secure clasp like a watch strap.

On the metal section you have the option to customise what you want on the band, such as medical conditions and emergency contact numbers.

The clever bit is this is linked to a website where you can add all of your important data such as medication, treatments etc. The website address is on the band, and if hospital/paramedics log onto this website they will be asked for a pin number which is on the inside of the band and this will then give them access to all the relevant emergency information that the wearer has updated on the site.

It's not cheap, they are around 25, however you get to chose the colour, type of band and metal section, what you put on the website and you get a sticker to put on your bike telling first responders to look for the wrist band.

Personally I never leave home for a training session without it, it is unobtrusive, fashionable and carries all the data needed to give me piece of mind should the worse happen.

onelifeID.com worth a look.


Response posted on 30th August 2019 by:
mottershaw stuart

E: stuart.mottershaw7309@leicestershire.pnn.police.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Michael McDonnell, send me your email address and I'll send you some pics of the bracelet.


Response posted on 2nd September 2019 by:
Peter Swanwick

E: PeterSwanwick@southend.gov.uk
T: 1702215193

ICE data for Cyclists

I have adapted the green spot / Crash Card. Although designed for P2W riders I cut the edges off the card and covered in clear tape to water proof. When I did crash on my pedal bike a while ago the paramedics notices a had a green spot and knew why it was there. May be worth contacting Crash Card UK to see if they are developing further for PC riders and other helmet wearers, eg jet-sky, equestrian. I also have two 'ICE' numbers in my (not locked) phone.


http://www.crashcard.co.uk/


Response posted on 2nd September 2019 by:
Garrad Bailey

E: garrad.bailey@southglos.gov.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Hi Michael

The Road Safety Team at South Gloucestershire Council provide Crash Cards designed for cyclists, which we give out to cyclists in our area.

The Crash Card consists of a narrow plastic 'wallet' (about 15mm wide, 50mm long) which sticks to the side of a cycle helmet. The riders information in enclosed in the wallet.

Contact me for further info.

Garrad


Response posted on 2nd September 2019 by:
Matthew McDonald

E: matthew.mcdonald@devon.gov.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Hello, some cycle helmets use to come supplied with a very small sticker for contact details etc to be entered onto.


Response posted on 2nd September 2019 by:
Michael McDonnell

E: michael.mcdonnell@transport.gov.scot
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Thanks for the feedback, everyone - very helpful. As one respondent noted, not all cyclists wear a helmet, so it may be different solutions may be necessary. Thanks again.


Response posted on 14th October 2019 by:
Sue Smith

E: susansmith@humbersidefire.gov.uk
T:

ICE data for Cyclists

Medical Data Carriers can be ordered from the website www.medicaldatacarrier.com and these can be customized to your requirements.


Post a response to the above help request by completing the form below:

Your name
Your email
Your telephone (optional)
Subject
My response is:
Captcha: