Help Forum

Help requested posted on 19th February 2019:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

Has anyone had any research carried out on accidents involving 60+ pedestrians they are willing to share? We are looking for key findings and recommendations on how to address the safety of this age group.

Sue Snoddy

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Response posted on 20th February 2019 by:
Graham Mylward

E: road.safety@hants.gov.uk
T: 01962 832211

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

We haven't carried out any formal research studies on pedestrians but through our work with older road users, and particularly older drivers my feeling is that older pedestrians are most vulnerable in complex situations where information processing speeds need to be high. For example, when crossing a main road near a junction.

We have found that one thing that suffers as age increases is the ability for drivers to constantly update information at a sufficient speed in complex road situations.

This would appear to be the main reason why older drivers are vulnerable to turning right across traffic. We have noticed a good look both ways before emerging but that observation is not often updated as the driver carries out the turn and, therefore, vulnerable to a change in the situation.

Happy to discuss further if it helps at all.

Graham Mylward, Driver Skills Scheme 60+


Response posted on 20th February 2019 by:
kris beuret

E: krisbeuret@sraltd.co.uk
T:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

The EU Sameru project involved case studies of elderly pedestrians in Southend and Preston - some good initiatives assessed. Still relevant.

https://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/sites/roadsafety/files/pdf/projects/sameru.pdf

See also summary of other relevant EU research

http://archive.etsc.eu/documents/Tira_Safety_of_pedestrians_and_cyclists_in_urban_areas.pdf


Response posted on 20th February 2019 by:
Will Cubbin

E: william.cubbin@essexhighways.org
T:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

I have produced a brief summary of older pedestrian issues, bringing together some headline findings from academic research and some key facts distilled from collision data in Essex.
It is only a two page summary document but may be of help.
If you want me to send you a copy please send me an email.


Response posted on 20th February 2019 by:
Charles Musselwhite

E: c.b.a.musselwhite@swansea.ac.uk
T:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

I have written the following:
"In the UK, people over the age of 70 make up 11.8% of the population (ONS, 2015), and account for around 8% of pedestrian activity (DfT, 2015a,b). Older people also account for a staggering 42.8% of all pedestrian fatalities: 191 deaths from 446 across all age groups in total (DfT, 2015a,b). That means almost half the pedestrians killed on roads come from just over 11% of the population. Countries that have more stringent licence renewal process for older drivers, can face an increase in the number of road traffic related injuries and deaths with older people, as people switch from the car to being a pedestrian (Mitchell, 2013).
A look at police data, collected at the scene of road collisions in Britain, shows that failure to judge vehicle speed is a significant factor in older people’s road collisions as pedestrians (DfT, 2015b). This correlates with data in Australia (Job, 1998), France (Domnes, et al., 2014), the Netherlands (Dijkstra, & Bos, 1997) and several other countries (See PROMISING, 2001). Generally, older pedestrians look less at traffic and accept significantly smaller gaps in traffic when crossing the road than younger pedestrians. Looking at the barriers to walking for older people may help reveal where safety improvements can occur."
from Musselwhite, Charles. (2018) Transportation and Promoting Physical Activity Among Older People. In The Palgrave Handbook of Ageing and Physical Activity Promotion. (pp. 507-526). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.

Also, I have found using three case study areas in the United Kingdom, found 88% of people aged over 65 did not walk at this speed. This increased to 94% of older females over the age of 65. Previous research has found similar results, suggesting older people’s average speeds are between 0.7 and 0.9 metres per second. (e.g. Asher et al., 2012, Newton and Ormerod, 2008).
Musselwhite, C. (2015). Environment–person interactions enabling walking in later life. Transportation Planning and Technology 38(1), 44-61.
Asher, L., Aresu, M., Falaschetti, E.A., & Mindell, J. 2012. Most older pedestrians are unable to cross the road in time: a cross-sectional study. Age and Ageing, 41, 690- 694.
Newton, R. & Ormerod, M. (2008). The design of streets with older people in mind: Design guide - Materials of footways and footpaths. I’DGO Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors. Available at http://www.idgo.ac.uk/design_guidance/factsheets/materials_footways_footpaths.htm


Response posted on 22nd February 2019 by:
Tim Schewe

E: tim@drivesmartbc.ca
T:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

You may find useful information here as well: https://www.roadsafeseniors.org/


Response posted on 28th February 2019 by:
Sue Snoddy

E: sue.snoddy@bradford.gov.uk
T:

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

Many thanks for all your responses


Response posted on 6th March 2019 by:
Chris Wheal

E: SRS.kentfocus@outlook.com
T: 01622 858100

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

Hi
I am the founder of Senior Road Safety - Kent Focus Group and launched
Website SRSKENT.Co.UK in April 2018 having reasearched the subject
over a long period of time.

Please feel free to call me to discuss what we have available and
findings.

Chris Wheal


Response posted on 6th March 2019 by:
Chris Wheal

E: SRS.kentfocus@outlook.com
T: 01622 858100

Accidents involving 60+ pedestrians

Hi
I am the founder of Senior Road Safety - Kent Focus Group and launched
Website SRSKENT.Co.UK in April 2018 having reasearched the subject
over a long period of time.

Please feel free to call me to discuss what we have available and
findings.

Chris Wheal


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