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Help requested posted on 7th February 2019:

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

I'm working on a Walk Routes to School Policy. For assessing how difficult a road is to cross (without refuges/zebras/lights etc), our gap analysis is being questioned. The traditional walk speed of 3ft (0.91m) per second and carriageway width tends to be used e.g. crossing a standard 7.3m carriageway would take 8.02 seconds. However, I've also read that some authorities factor-in an additional 1 second 'thinking time.' Does anyone consider additional factors like this or do you just stick to the basic carriageway width by walk speed calculation? Thanks.

Gary

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Response posted on 8th February 2019 by:
Delphine Norton

E: delphine.norton@lincolnshire.gov.uk
T: 07909926232

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

Hi Gary I do the Route Assessments for Lincolnshire County Council and we use the Road Safety GB guidelines. if you would like to email me I can send you a copy of what we use.
Delphine


Response posted on 11th February 2019 by:
Sarah Collins

E: sarah.collins@cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk
T: 01244 976713

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

Hi Gary
We use the RSGB guidelines too in Cheshire West and Chester, saves any complications.
Sarah


Response posted on 11th February 2019 by:
Rob Camp

E: r.j.camp@dorsetcc.gov.uk
T: 01305224548

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

Hi Gary

In Dorset we use the respective national guidelines for both assessing School Crossing Patrol sites and undertaking a walked route assessment in respect of school transport appeal. So two sets of guidelines clearly outlining a robust and defendable approach.


Response posted on 11th February 2019 by:
Andy Swallowe

E: Andy.Swallowe@cambridgeshire.gov.uk
T:

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

I conduct the Home to School Transport reviews for Cambridgeshire CC. We adopted RSGB Best Practice Gap Analysis which advises 1 second per metre of road to cross. However it also advises that longer may be required for vulnerable groups such as older or disabled pedestrian groups.


Response posted on 14th February 2019 by:
David Davies

E: david.davies@pacts.org.uk
T:

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

Having heard Prof John Wann, Royal Holloway, UoL, at the Rospa conference yesterday, I would certainly look at his work on children, looming and ability to judge approach time/speed.


Contact Rospa for the details.


Response posted on 14th February 2019 by:
Rod King

E: rod.k@20splenty.org
T: 7973639781

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

WE have a briefing on this which references the work of Prof John Wann and also Prof Jodie Plumert.

Both come to the conclusion that unless the speed of traffic is 20mph or below then primary school children cannot reliably cross the road safely.

This ties in with the WHO, OECD recommendation that where pedestrians and cycles mix with motor vehicles then the correct speed limit is 30km/h or 20mph.

Our briefing also links to the civil liability cases which are appropriate. I would recommend reviewing our briefing before advising any children to cross a road where the local authority endorses 30mph speed with a 30mph limit.

http://www.20splenty.org/duty_of_care_mandates_20mph


Response posted on 18th February 2019 by:
Richard Hall

E: richard.hall@northlincs.gov.uk
T: 01724 297346

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

The Road Safety GB guidelines for the assessment of walked routes to school do give 3 feet per second as a standard walking speed when assessing gaps in traffic flow for crossing the road but also allow for some needing larger gaps.
An important principle in the guidelines, based on case law, is that children should be accompanied as necessary when travelling to and from school.


Response posted on 21st February 2019 by:
mottershaw stuart

E: stuart.mottershaw7309@leicestershire.pnn.police.uk
T:

Gap Analysis for Pupils Crossing Roads

Can I ask a slightly off topic question please?
I have been asked to construct a Road Safety classroom delivery for 11-15 year olds.

There appears to be a definite gap, particularly in Leicestershire for engaging with children in those age ranges, however younger children and older teens are well catered for.

Schools have shown a lack of appetite for whatever reason, possibly curriculum constraints for delivering road safety at this age group.

Do any of you do anything for kids this age, and if so what are you doing? I am currently looking at VR as having a middle aged man talking to you about road safety would be mind numbing and I want to avoid death by powerpoint...


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